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The commentary from the link "The Role of Women in the Book Judges" is indeed interesting reading although I do not fully subscrtibe to some of the ideas that are discussed in the article.
I get the message that it is only when men fail to lead because of their lack of trust and faith in God, that women are given the opportunity to lead? That this could spell disaster in the end?

I will probably be attacked for saying this. But there are those among us women who can equally take positions of strong leadership regardless of whether men fail or not.
And what is bothersome to me is when women do take on positions of leadership, that they are attributed all sorts of negative labels.

In the context of marriage, a strong woman---emotionally and spiritually---is a great asset in keeping the marriage together.

Reading " Women of the Bible" by Spangler and Syswerda ---a one-year devotional study of women in Scripture has opened my eyes to many of the women I've never heard of in my earlier religion/theological studies.

Rosyln,

I don't think the issue is that woman can't lead, The Apostle Paul sent his Letter to The Romans, by way of a woman. The issue is men, who are designated or purposed to be leaders (Yes, God does have a plan and a purpose for everyone, even if they fail, like Israel and the Church, to step up to the plate) not taking their role.

Not every man is leadership material; ask Korah and his gang, as well as Aaron. In the exodus and in the desert, Moses was the man God chose. When males fail to be men, women suffer. The problem is people do not understand what it means to be in a leadership position, thus they fail at leading. Jesus definitely was and is a leader; however, he led by serving, empowering those who follow Him to do the work they were designed to do or created for.

To get the true picture of what is meant one MUST go back to “In the Beginning ..” before the fall of man. We are a broken people, using our gifts, talents and abilities wrongly. When the purpose of a thing is not understood, abuse is inevitable (Rev. Myles Monroe). We must go back to God’s original intent not what we see with out eyes and experience in a fallen world.

I think it's a sign of judgment on the men of Israel for their lack of faith and their seeking a life of comfort and maybe they just got tired of fighting...

Judges 1-2:9

Seeing something for the very first time after seeing it over and over is both stunning and invigorating. I’m reading these verses and saying, “Why didn’t I see that before?”

Israel’s failure to root out the enemies most likely came from a kind of self-satisfaction with their initial conquest: A sudden change of perspective from God’s point of view to their humanly point of view regarding the strength of their enemies and their own strength. Success, if not carefully handled, can make you think you are, “All that and a bag of chips.”

The problem with them and with us is this, we forget that it is God working in us and for us to do … [Not in your own strength] for it is God Who is all the while effectually at work in you [energizing and creating in you the power and desire], both to will and to work for His good pleasure and satisfaction and delight. (Philippians 2:13 AMP).

After Israel crossed the Jordan and before Israel attacked Jericho, if you call that an attack, they did two things, circumcise all the males who were not circumcised in the wilderness, and celebrate Passover. Before Passover is celebrated one of the household chores that MUST be done is removing all traces of Yeast, no matter hot tiny or insignificant. That yeast represented sin; big sin, little sin, garden variety sin—sin is sin and it needed to be rooted out completely not partially. When Israel chose to leave some of that sin, make friends with that sin, use that sin to work for them, they failed at understanding and translating the ritual of removing ALL yeast out of their daily lives.

We understand this medically. If I have surgery to have cancer cells removed, a good surgeon will not say, “Hey, I’m tired. I’ve been at this cancer removal now for about three hours, going on four and there is only a little bit of cancer cells remaining. I’ll close up now and go home and take a nap.” I am a dead person!

In answer to the entire nation on who should be the tribe that attacks first, God says, "Judah, for I have given them victory over the land." It was God not them at work. Then three more times in the first chapter (verses 4, 19, and 22), is either states the Lord gave them victory or the Lord was with them. That God was with them, when they failed to root out the enemy means that it wasn’t that these folk were stronger, bigger or had better weapons, it means there was a failure of perseverance, they didn’t get out all the cancer cells. Not only is this enemy dangerous to them militarily, but more important this enemy is dangerous to their souls.

My question to myself is this, How many times have I played with the enemy of sin because I grew weary, thought the “sin” was beneficial. How many times did I let pride take over and failed to not understand that it is,
[Not in your own strength] for it is God Who is all the while effectually at work in you [energizing and creating in you the power and desire], both to will and to work for His good pleasure and satisfaction and delight. (Philippians 2:13 AMP).

LORD HAVE MERCY!

Grace and peace,
Ramona

Rosyln, I think this issue of women leading in the church because men have 'defaulted' is something that irks me. I applaud your courage in stating your view.

The fact is, there are multiple perspectives on this complex topic falling under the categories of egalitarian, complimentarian, and some other views that are not coming to mind right now. Our formlery Brethren church (I dislike that name 'brethren") recently made a decision (long overdue) to include women in positions of elder leadership. It has taken us 6 years, yes 6 years to come to this prayerfully studied position. I realize there are those who would question just about every interpretation we have made on specific verses but the fact is, there is room to have different convictions and practices. Some will argue, (good friends of mine) that we are heading towards the end times with 'allowing women' into leadership equal to men. I say, give me a break. Has anyone taken care to highlight the women of God that have been raised up throughout church history recent and past, that have breathed life into the church.

There are godly and intelligent men and women on both sides of the issue of women in church leadership. Suffice it to say there have been VOLUMES written. I have found great help in Ronald Pierce and Rebecca Merrill Groothius and Gordon D. Fee (author of How to read the Bible for all its worth) book "Discovering Biblical Equality--Complementarian without Hierarchy" very helpful in maintaining a balanced and thoughtful perspective.

as well N.T Wright, probably the leading scholar on New testament studies has a lecture called "Men, Women, and the Church" delivered in september 2004. It's worth reading and can be found at www.ntwrightpage.com

Having just celebrated the resurrection of our Lord let's remember something important that Wright points out. Please bear with the lenghty quote.
"It is interesting that there comes a time in the story when the disciples all forsake Jesus and runaway; and at that point, long before the rehabilitation of Peter and the others, it is the women who come first to the tomb, who are the first to see the risen Jesus, and are the first to be entrusted with the news that he has been raised from the dead. This is of incalculable signficance. Mary Magadelene and the others are apostles to the apostles. We should not be surprised that Paul calls a woman named Junia an apostle in Romans 16:7. If an apostle is a witness to the resurrection there were women who deserved that title before any of the men." By the way I am aware that there is debate as to whether Junia was actually a man. There is not a shred of historical or exegetical argument available to those who keep insisting Junias was a man.
One thing my wife, a gifted leader herself, says to me, is "Luch please don't patronize me or any other woman. We have been gifted by God and are accountable before the Lord for our stewardship. There is neither male nor female, for we are all one in Christ Jesus." Galatians 3:28

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