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June 1, 2008

Although I like the way John describes the two angels asking Mary Magdalene why she is crying and then turning she sees Jesus standing there, I still like Luke’s description of the angel asking her, “Why do you seek the living among the dead. Jesus is not here, He has risen.” Luke’s description says it all; Jesus died, has risen from the dead and is again living.

The description of Thomas doubting that the Lord had appeared to the other ten has always provided me with a level of comfort. Not that he doubted, but at what Jesus told him when He appeared to Thomas, John 20:29 “Then Jesus told him, "Because you have seen me, you have believed; blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed.” (NIV). Jesus gives all who believe without seeing a blessing. What a comfort knowing that we have received a blessing by believing that Jesus rose from the dead and is sitting at the right hand of God without seeing physical proof. I know of one other place in the New Testament where Jesus gives us a blessing, Revelation 1:3 “Blessed is the one who reads the words of this prophecy, and blessed are those who hear it and take to heart what is written in it, because the time is near.” (NIV). How wonderful it is to hear Jesus give us a blessing!

Yours in Christ
Skip

My initial reaction to David's grieving was similar to yours, Mike. But then I thought: David is an archetype for Jesus... a precursor and a sign pointing to what was to come through his lineage. I therefore think of David's grieving as being more akin to Jesus' weeping for Jerusalem (Matt 23:37; Luke 13:34) and the parable of the lost sheep (Matt 18:12; Luke 15:4). Yeah, the rest of his folks may be confused at his reaction, but he specifically says, he (David) would rather have died for Absalom, with the implication that, had he done so, Absalom would not have been lost to eternal damnation. The rest of David's flock were going to be fine. He was grieved that he could not save all of them. Only Jesus can do that.

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